Writing Life: Using Your (Real-Life) Antagonist

Over the past few weeks, I’ve been dealing with an unhappy person.  This person is angry at someone else, and I got caught in the crossfire.

I’m collateral damage.

Everyone who is “in” on the situation has reassured me that I’m not at fault. I’m simply an unlucky casualty in this person’s emotional (and, truth be told, childish) war.

I’ve told myself again and again to shake it off. Move on. Forget about it. It’s not me, it’s her.

But here’s the thing…

villainIt hurts when someone attacks you, even when you know they aren’t in their right mind.

Remember Dolores Claiborne?

Because this happened at an organization and just in my personal life, I’ve had to spend hours and hours discussing what should be done, how we handle her in her “fragile state” without making her fly (even further) off the handle.

A friend gave my favorite suggestion: have her committed.

He was voted down.

Even though part of me feels sorry for her, it doesn’t feel fair. I’ve had to endure unpleasant emails and verbal exchanges from her that were downright mean.

At this point, nothing I say will change anything. She has lumped me in with her bad guys because I happened to walk in the room at the wrong time.

In her eyes, I’m fair game.

She has become my real-life antagonist.

After a few (okay, many) deep breaths, I decided to take the high road, turn the other cheek, and dive headfirst into the role of the strong and unflinching heroine.

I’m not at all dramatic. how-to-deal-with-psychopaths

Even though I knew this was the best approach, a part of me wanted to fight back, to reach into my own bag of nasty, and give her a taste of her own medicine.

I didn’t.

I remained the sane, calm person at the crazy lady tea party.

But I didn’t totally let it go. I’m human after all, and I decided to get my own unique version of revenge.

Do you know want to know what I did?

I wrote her into a short story.

I cast her as the antagonist. I exaggerated her features and made her grotesque – the kind of ugly that makes babies (and grown men) cry.

I made sure she received her just deserts (a terrible, gut-wrenching poison that made her bleed from every orifice while simultaneously experiencing diarrhea and severe vomiting – it was awful).

torture in hellI made her hair fall out and her skin boil. I made her pancreas explode.

I made sure my paper antagonist suffered far more than I would ever wish on my real-life antagonist.

In short, I sent her to Hell.

Some might consider this petty.

But I wrote in the safety and privacy of my own home. I didn’t say anything I’d regret to the actual person. I haven’t shown it to anyone else. And it helped me behave better in person than I ever could have otherwise.

In fact, those involved are still wowed by how nobly I have been handling the situation.

(They don’t know me like you do, dear reader).

I did feel a (very) small twinge of guilt at my nasty writing streak, but I got over it quickly when I realized how ridiculous my short story is and how it will never make it off the hard drive.

I got over it because after writing the story, I feel better.

It’s true. By writing out all of my anger and frustration, I’m able to truly forgive and move on.

Plus there’s a bonus

Now have lots of raw material I might use in the future.

So really, I should thank my real-life antagonist.

But I won’t.

Have you ever written about a real-life antagonist? How did it go? I’d love to hear stories from you!

Writing Prompt: Using Facebook to Craft Poems (and other writing)

facebookHello.  My name is Kaecey, and I’m a social media Luddite. 

Though I stay connected to this century social media for work, when it comes to my personal life I barely use Facebook, didn’t want a Twitter account until the Writer’s Digest October Platform Challenge got me connecting, and finally tried Google+ for the first time.  Today.

So how can I write a post that utilizes Facebook and the linchpin? Moreover, Facebook and poetry don’t seem like two entities that go together – at least not from the perspective of using Facebook to write poetry. What gives?

Simple.  I’m writing this post because I am a fan of taking advantage of whatever works to generate creativity and get poems (or fiction or any writing ideas) out of the ether and onto the page.  And I promise you – if you fully execute this technique, you will end up with a poem.  Or character.  Or beginning of a story… you get the picture.

So what is this Facebook writing technique?  

It’s fun, it’s easy, and you can do it even if you don’t have a Facebook account.  Trust me.

First, scroll through your list of FB friends until you come across names from your childhood of people you haven’t really kept up with over the years.  If you don’t have any FB friends that reach back that far, settle for FB friends that you are merely acquaintances with in real life – the point is to find people you know, but people you don’t know well. You want to be surprised.

Second, visit the pages of these FB friends and look at their most recent post.  Ideally, the first page you visit is the one you’ll use, but if it really doesn’t work move down the list.

Third, using whatever this person posted as your inspiration, brainstorm words and phrases that immediately come to mind.  Try to incorporate sensory language if possible, but stay true to whatever pops into your head.

Fourth, write a poem (or story) inspired by the FB friend’s post and your brainstormed list.  It can be a poem in any form or style. It can be a flash fiction. A short story. It can even be the start of your own memoir. The point is to WRITE.

If you’re not on Facebook, you can search old emails, greeting cards and letters, or use another social media source (like Twitter or Google+) to accomplish the same result.

I first thought of this technique when I randomly clicked on the Facebook page of a childhood friend with whom I had not had any contact other than to accept her Friend request years ago.  I was shocked and saddened to learn that she had just lost her father.  Her most recent post happened to be picture from her childhood of her at about preschool age sitting on her dad’s lap.  They were reading a book together, and the caption read, “Missing my dad today.”  The photo was grainy and the clothes were standard late seventies/early eighties plaid.  Her dad was sporting some seriously impressive sideburns, and my friend’s cheeks were bright red, the way kids’ cheeks get after playing outside in the snow.

I was overcome with emotion and wonder, so I started writing down ideas and words that popped into my head as I gazed at the picture.  And those words evolved into a poem.

If you give it a try, let me know!  I’d love to hear if it works for you.  And if you have other Facebook-inspired writing ideas, please share!

Writing Prompt: What to Write When Nothing Comes

Maybe you’ve been lucky and never drawn a blank when sitting down to write. But if bored_by_publicdomainpictures-netyou’re like me, you’ve sat. And sat. And looked up prompts. And doodled. And refreshed your coffee. Or tea. Or water. Or whiskey. You’ve told yourself, “Go!” then stared numbly at the screen. So you surfed the net, checked and deleted email. Answered the phone. Did the dishes. Dreamed up fanciful and creative menus for your family that you’ll never make. And decided to go to bed early (or late).

And promised yourself that tomorrow you’ll be able to get something down. trick_by_publicdomainreview.org

If this is sounding a little too familiar, I have a trick that helps when you find yourself thinking, “I have nothing to write about.” I’m going to describe it as it relates to poetry, but it could be used with any genre. I have found that when I’m stuck with nothing for my fiction, writing poetry can help shake things loose.

Okay, ready for the trick? Here it is:

Write the opposite.

I know, I know. You’re thinking, “What? This gal has really lost it. Write the opposite of what?!

Let me explain…

Take a poem – any poem. It can be one you’ve written, it can be a classic, it can be one you love, or one you hate. Go through it line by line and write the opposite of whatever the sentiment is in that line.

Here’s an example using Robert Frost’s “The Road Not Taken:”

woods_by_publicdomain


Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both ….

To write the opposite, I could do something like this:

woods2_by_publicdomain
In the purpled woods, two roads collided 

and glad was I to find the path so clear ….

That is an off-the-cuff example that could use (a lot) of work. Regardless, it demonstrates what I mean. At least I hope it does!

To complete the exercise, I would go through every line. If all of sudden in the middle of this task something sparks and I’m inspired, I might drop the exercise and run with my new idea. If not, I’d keep at it, line by line. Then revise and make changes, look for better words and better imagery.

And at the end of the day, I’ll have a poem. At the very least, I’ll have made good use of the day and worked my creative muscles. Writing the opposite it harder than it sounds. It forces you to be creative, look for ways to describe emotions, places, and people. And it can result in some phenomenal poetry!

Don’t believe me? Give it a try! And let me know what you think.

I’m curious – what do you do when the muse is silent? I’d love to hear other tips and tricks!